Another ship sinks

During the night, around 400 migrants are believed to have drowned trying to reach Europe after their ship capsized. As it gets warmer, more migrants attempt to make the journey.

Survivors of a capsized migrant boat off Libya have told the aid group Save the Children that around 400 people are believed to have drowned. Even before the survivors were interviewed, Italy’s coast guard said it assumed that there were many dead given the size of the ship and that nine bodies had been found.

If anyone can cook and wants to do something worthwhile this summer, they might think of heading down to help out.

Immigration stories

The Guardian has put together a fascinating collection of stories about the experiences of immigrants in Britain. Some of them are very positive, others much less so … Wouldn’t it be interesting to do something like that here?

To the contrary of what people usually assume, my life standard back in Turkey was way better in material terms. However I was at this point in my life where I felt the urge to make a drastic change. I wasn’t particularly planning to move to the UK.

Job opportunity for chefs in Kilkee, Ireland

Lir at Kilkee Golf Club is looking for chefs (head chefs, chefs de partie, pastry chefs). If anyone is interested, or knows anyone (maybe working in a restaurant here in Bergamo or Milan) who may want to move to Ireland for a while, please contact Sandra Quinn through Living in Bergamo (livinginbergamo@gmail.com). It is a fantastic restaurant and offers an excellent opportunity for an English-spearking professional in the industry to experience life in Ireland and work in a busy and professional kitchen. At least three years’ experience would be necessary.

Generation emigration, from The Irish Times

A recent ‘Generation Emigration’ article from The Irish Times. I always find it difficult to resist reading these.

I long for the man at passport control to acknowledge me and my journey. A simple “Welcome home, it’s great to have you back!”

As someone who has always felt like a a bit of a tourist in Ireland (‘where in the States are you from?’, the kept asking me at UCD), I can kind of, sort of, identify with the feeling she describes, of wanting to be welcomed home, but not knowing if you really are at home at all.